“When you turn down £500 cash (50% discount) in your hand today because they are not your super client!!!! ARGH!!! lol Off to lie down!”

I love this post!

A lady in one of my Facebook groups posted it and it started a big discussion that might not have gone the way you might expect. Instead of bemoaning the fact that she had ‘lost’ £500, everyone in the group was cheering her on and saying how well she had done! And they were right! She’s a very talented photographer and puts a lot of work into every client project.

She made me laugh because her next comment was “My head was going ‘just take it, go on’ but my mouth kept saying nope!!!… I know it was super cheeky of him to ask for that kind of discount but I’d have only had myself to blame if I’d have taken it!”
This is the power of knowing your Super Customer. She knew that if she had taken that money and discounted her prices by  50% even though she really needed the money and it was right there, ready to grab, several things would have happened:
  • She would have under-valued her service – it’s worth what she charges for it and if she had taken 50% less then she is telling the Universe and herself that she’s not really worth what she charges. It might sound woowoo but if YOU don’t value your time and expertise, how can you expect anyone else to?
  • She would have begrudged the work – it wouldn’t have flowed, it would have felt like hard work and she would have been carrying out the project knowing that the customer wasn’t prepared to pay the proper price.
  • If someone else had come along, who was prepared to pay her usual rates, she would have had to say ‘no’ because she was booked up with this ‘half price deal’
  • The customer clearly didn’t value her enough to respect her pricing – he was looking for ‘cheap’ and that always spells trouble.There’s nothing wrong with bargain hunting but when you are dealing with someone’s time and expertise and livelihood and you want cheap, that’s a different matter. Clients who want ‘cheap’ under those circumstances often become nightmare clients because they don’t value you or respect you.They are hard to work with. They are tricky – they try to squeeze ever more from the deal, stall signing it off and then become troublesome payers, if you invoice them.

But she didn’t give in to temptation or pressure.

She said ‘no, thank you’.

By doing that she showed him that she values herself and her service.

  • She proved to herself that she is brave and bold and confident enough in her service to not have to discount.
  • She showed the Universe that she’s prepared to stick it out and wait for a better client who loves and values what she does, and she’s made room for them by saying ‘no’ to bad business.
  • She’s let that ‘bad’ client go and find someone else to work with, someone cheaper who maybe doesn’t value themselves as much. That’s their call, but she’s not prepared to compromise at that level.
  • She’s freed up time that she would have spent begrudgingly working for him.
  • She knew that the £500 she rejected could have cost her much, much more in time wasted, energy sapped and confidence battered. It’s a ‘no-brainer’ when you think about it.

She’s done herself proud.

And I am really proud of her, as are the other ladies in the group.

It’s hard to say ‘no’ to the money, especially when it’s being dangled in front of your face and you’re feeling a bit broke. But it’s harder to deal with the consequences of saying yes.

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